On October 14, 1913, an explosion tore through Universal Colliery, killing 439 miners to become Britain’s worst ever mining disaster. The final death toll was 440 after a rescuer perished. We’ll stop supporting this browser soon. In a mine in which nearly a thousand men were working an explosion occurred,, which shook the whole valley. Senghenydd Colliery Disaster - The Brooklyn Daily Eagle October 14,1913 See more. In 1901 a disaster caused the deaths of 81 men and boys. 1913 pit disaster At 8.00am on Tuesday 14 October 1913 a huge explosion rocked the tiny town of Senghenydd, to the north of Caerphilly. A remembrance service has been held at the National Mining Memorial in Senghenydd to mark the 106th anniversary of the Senghenydd Mining Disaster. Senghenydd mine closed in 1928. The Senghenydd Colliery Disaster, also known as the Senghenydd Explosion occurred in Senghenydd, near Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales, on 14 October 1913, killing 439 miners and one rescuer. Universal Colliery, on the South Wales Coalfield, extracted steam coal, which … Read it and discover if Lauren is strong enough to surf her way through minefields towards happiness and success whilst choosing to research the Senghenydd Colliery Disaster of 1913 in S. This was followed by a huge black blast from the pit-shaft, and a devastating fire. Senghenydd Colliery Disaster - Daily Mirror front page 15/10/1913. The Senghenydd colliery disaster, also known as the Senghenydd explosion (Welsh: Tanchwa Senghennydd), occurred at the Universal Colliery in Senghenydd, near Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales, on 14 October 1913.The explosion, which killed 439 miners and a rescuer, is the worst mining accident in the United Kingdom. Aber Valley Heritage Museum: The Senghenydd Colliery Disaster - See 25 traveler reviews, 3 candid photos, and great deals for Caerphilly, UK, at Tripadvisor. At 8.00am on Tuesday 14 October 1913 a huge explosion rocked the tiny town of Senghenydd, to the north of Caerphilly.It came from the coal mine belonging to the Universal Colliery… The Senghenydd colliery disaster, also known as the Senghenydd explosion (Welsh: Tanchwa Senghennydd), occurred at the Universal Colliery in Senghenydd, near Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales, on 14 October 1913. A memorial was erected in 1981 to serve as a reminder of some of the cost of the Industrial Revolution. It is the worst mining accident in the United Kingdom, and one of the most serious globally in terms of loss of life. It came from the coal mine belonging to the Universal Colliery, the most significant employer in the area, and before the hour was out it was clear to everyone, miners and their families alike, that what had happened was a disaster of major proportions. For the best experience please update your browser. The new memorial unveiled this week to the 440 workers who lost their lives in the Senghenydd mining disaster is truly sobering.. Twelve years later, on the morning of 14th October 1913 explosions ripped through the mine 440 miners were killed in the blast the highest death toll in any single mining disaster. A walled garden was also opened with tiles inscribed with the details of those killed in the two Senghenydd disasters as well as a "path of memory," which marks the other colliery tragedies in Wales. An appalling disaster, which it is feared may prove to be the worst in British colliery records, occurred on Tuesday at Senghenydd, near Cardiff.