Narrow Way, by David Hayward (naked pastor). For them as for other Christians, probably the best-known passage in which these words are conjoined is Matthew 7:13-14: "Enter ye in at the strait gate: …because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it." For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.

Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: KJV , YLT Verse Concepts MEANING The phrase the straight and narrow means the honest and morally acceptable way of living.. 7:13–14). Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.” This whole narrative is in regard to our relationship with one another. Jesus is the narrow gate.
Matthew 7:14 King James Version (KJV). Bunyan took it for more than the central theme of his classic, The Pilgrim’s Progress; to him, the strait gate was a method of discerning right and wrong and choosing among questionable activities.

The primary reason for failure is the natural tendency to want a broader road than any real success will permit. Matthew 7:13-14 King James Version (KJV).

13 Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: The phrase “strait/straight and narrow” does not appear in the Bible, though the foundation in Matthew 7:13,14 is obvious. "Strait" and "narrow" mean approximately the same: constricted, tight. Though not all will enter through Him, many will, and will receive eternal life. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it." 14 Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.


The strait gate metaphor was used, fourth, as a guide to appropriate Christian values and behavior. Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Matthew 7:14 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it. “Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it” (Matt. Matthew 7:13,14. Everyone wants to be successful and happy, and yet many fall down. Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.

Question: "Why did God make salvation such a narrow path?" 13 Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: 14 Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it. Answer: In Matthew 7:13–14, Jesus said, "Enter through the narrow gate. ORIGIN The adjective strait is from Old French forms such as estreit (modern French étroit), meaning tight, close, narrow, from Latin strictus (cf. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: The World English Bible translates the passage as: Enter in by the narrow gate; for wide is the gate … English strict), past participle of the verb stringere, to tighten, to bind tightly (cf.